The first couple of books I’ve worked on as an editor are out this month! Even though, as an intern, “worked on” means mostly just proofing, I’m still excited to see them actually complete.

asexual-not-a-sexual:

Went to the Guggenheim and saw the current show on Italian Futurism. (One day before it comes down, aw yeah.)

It was super great, and had like 95% of the works I would wanna see in a show on Futurism. 

I love Futurist works, but, holy shit, I always forget what giant dicks those guys were. 

cahi-iu:

2014/15 at CAHI: Margaret Atwood, and more…
We are delighted to announce that the great Canadian novelist Margaret Atwood will be visiting in February 2015 as a Ruth N. Halls Distinguished Lecturer. She will give a public presentation and reading, and will be available to sign books. We have also set aside ninety minutes in her visit for a students-only meeting with her. We hope you will encourage your students to attend, and that as many of us as is feasible will consider including work by Atwood on our spring 2015 syllabi.
A winner of many international literary awards, including the prestigious Booker Prize, Margaret Atwood is the author of more than forty volumes of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and non-fiction. She is perhaps best known for her novels, which include The Edible Woman, The Handmaid’s Tale, The Robber Bride, Alias Grace, The Blind Assassin, Oryx and Crake, and The Year of the Flood. Atwood’s work has been published in more than forty languages, including Farsi, Japanese, Turkish, Finnish, Korean, Icelandic and Estonian. In 2004, she co-invented the LongPen, a remote signing device that allows someone to write in ink anywhere in the world via tablet PC and the internet. She is also a popular personality on Twitter, with over 500,000 followers.
In October, CAHI is teaming up with the Libraries and the Provost’s Office of Scholarly Publishing to host Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Director of Scholarly Communication at the Modern Language Association, and author of Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (2011). Fitzpatrick is one of the best-informed and most creative minds tracking the transformations in scholarly publishing affecting us all. She will deliver a public presentation and will also help in the official opening of the new Scholars Commons in the Wells Library.
Photo of Margaret Atwood by George Whiteside.

This is going to be great. Plus a reading group with professors/grad students. Excited.

cahi-iu:

2014/15 at CAHI: Margaret Atwood, and more…

We are delighted to announce that the great Canadian novelist Margaret Atwood will be visiting in February 2015 as a Ruth N. Halls Distinguished Lecturer. She will give a public presentation and reading, and will be available to sign books. We have also set aside ninety minutes in her visit for a students-only meeting with her. We hope you will encourage your students to attend, and that as many of us as is feasible will consider including work by Atwood on our spring 2015 syllabi.

A winner of many international literary awards, including the prestigious Booker Prize, Margaret Atwood is the author of more than forty volumes of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and non-fiction. She is perhaps best known for her novels, which include The Edible Woman, The Handmaid’s Tale, The Robber Bride, Alias Grace, The Blind Assassin, Oryx and Crake, and The Year of the Flood. Atwood’s work has been published in more than forty languages, including Farsi, Japanese, Turkish, Finnish, Korean, Icelandic and Estonian. In 2004, she co-invented the LongPen, a remote signing device that allows someone to write in ink anywhere in the world via tablet PC and the internet. She is also a popular personality on Twitter, with over 500,000 followers.

In October, CAHI is teaming up with the Libraries and the Provost’s Office of Scholarly Publishing to host Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Director of Scholarly Communication at the Modern Language Association, and author of Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (2011). Fitzpatrick is one of the best-informed and most creative minds tracking the transformations in scholarly publishing affecting us all. She will deliver a public presentation and will also help in the official opening of the new Scholars Commons in the Wells Library.

Photo of Margaret Atwood by George Whiteside.

This is going to be great. Plus a reading group with professors/grad students. Excited.

Current annoyances:

People who walk in bike lanes.

People who take 48+ hours to respond to a relatively innocuous emailed question.

The latter is somewhat irrational and maybe self-centered, and also understandable. I really want an answer, but, people are busy, it’s cool.

The former, though. Unforgivable. Just, why. The sidewalk is literally 1 foot away.

in-ner-side:

Egon Schiele  Hand

in-ner-side:

Egon Schiele
Hand

Hold to the now, the here, through which all future plunges to the past.

thefantasticcaitlin:

The people making fun of your major are soulless and don’t know the meaning of happiness.

drawingarchitecture:

Dan Liu, Capriccio of Coal Exchange. 

drawingarchitecture:

Dan Liu, Capriccio of Coal Exchange. 

(Source: young-flowers)

O dark dark dark. They all go into the dark,
The vacant interstellar spaces, the vacant into the vacant,
The captains, merchant bankers, eminent men of letters,
The generous patrons of art, the statesmen and the rulers,
Distinguished civil servants, chairmen of many committees,
Industrial lords and petty contractors, all go into the dark,
And dark the Sun and Moon, and the Almanach de Gotha
And the Stock Exchange Gazette, the Directory of Directors,
And cold the sense and lost the motive of action.
And we all go with them, into the silent funeral,
Nobody’s funeral, for there is no one to bury.
I said to my soul, be still, and let the dark come upon you
Which shall be the darkness of God. As, in a theatre,
The lights are extinguished, for the scene to be changed
With a hollow rumble of wings, with a movement of darkness on darkness,
And we know that the hills and the trees, the distant panorama
And the bold imposing facade are all being rolled away—
Or as, when an underground train, in the tube, stops too long between stations
And the conversation rises and slowly fades into silence
And you see behind every face the mental emptiness deepen
Leaving only the growing terror of nothing to think about;
Or when, under ether, the mind is conscious but conscious of nothing—
I said to my soul, be still, and wait without hope
For hope would be hope for the wrong thing; wait without love
For love would be love of the wrong thing; there is yet faith
But the faith and the love and the hope are all in the waiting.
Wait without thought, for you are not ready for thought:
So the darkness shall be the light, and the stillness the dancing.
garden-of-vegan:

Sprouted grain cinnamon raisin English muffin topped with peanut butter, banana, pumpkin seeds, goji berries, and buckwheat groats + kiwis.

garden-of-vegan:

Sprouted grain cinnamon raisin English muffin topped with peanut butter, banana, pumpkin seeds, goji berries, and buckwheat groats + kiwis.

rock-n-rollin-bitch:

Film stills from Daisies (1966), directed by Vêra Chytilová. (x)

Summer here in Bloomington was pretty nice, but holy shit am I excited to actually see other human beings around campus; I am also rather ready for classes to start. Looking at my reading lists, and am so pumped already for Paradise Lost, The Jungle, and Melville discussions (though sadly not Moby Dick; I’d love to take a course on that.)
Oh, and for Pynchon, Wallace, Eliot, and Faulkner discussions with my adviser!
(Can you tell I really like being an English major?)